Soberlink Blog

Discussing the sober truth of alcohol, recovery, and aftercare monitoring

Using Remote Alcohol Monitoring After Treatment

Maintaining sobriety at a residential treatment facility is vastly different than staying sober at home. At treatment, there is no access to addictive substances, the patient receives regular counseling, and the stresses and triggers of family and work are removed. This allows the person struggling with alcoholism time to focus on physical and mental health issues and to prepare to return back home to a new normal of sober living.

7 Ways Alcohol Abuse Can Affect Children

Childhood memories are tricky things. You may not remember a trip you took as a child, but you probably remember going to the emergency room for stitches. You have surely forgotten thousands of days you spent in the classroom, but you may remember the day a teacher yelled at you. Childhood experiences that have the greatest impact are those that have a lot of feelings attached to them. Living with a parent who struggles with alcoholism can be a highly emotional experience. Perhaps that is why these childhood experiences are so powerful and long-lasting.

Alcohol Monitoring Accountability in the Palm of Your Hand

Deciding to be accountable to a sobriety program is a lifelong commitment for people with Alcohol Use Disorder. While it’s easy to recognize the importance of accountability, maintaining it as a life-decision over time is much more difficult. Key findings from the 2017 “Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health” note that people experience different risks depending on age, socioeconomic resources and access to support. While recognizing that there are many paths to wellness, new technology tools have shown “promising scientific evidence” to help people maintain sobriety, including the use of telehealth, digital monitoring and electronic support communities, the report adds.

The Power of Sober Parenting

When it comes to parenting, who wouldn’t like to have a few super powers? How about X-ray vision so you could look through walls and see if your child is really doing homework? Telekinesis would be very helpful when it’s time to straighten up the house! Here’s the good news: Parents may not have super powers, but they have more power than they think they do. And if you are a parent in recovery, you are far stronger than you were as a person struggling with alcoholism. You just have to learn how to nurture and use your power.

6 Ways Alcohol Monitoring Can Help Rebuild Trust

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), “problem drinking that becomes severe is given the medical diagnosis of ‘alcohol use disorder’ or AUD. AUD is a chronic relapsing brain disease characterized by compulsive alcohol use, loss of control over alcohol intake, and a negative emotional state when not using.” The NIAAA reports that approximately 16 million American adults have Alcohol Use Disorder.

Why Does Mental Health Awareness Matter For Those Who Are Affected By Addictions?

We are in the midst of Mental Health Awareness Month, a month dedicated to promoting education, understanding, and compassion for the many ways mental illness affects us, our loved ones, and our communities. One goal of this month is to help people understand that they don’t have to suffer silently or suffer consequences in their lives due to their symptoms, and that there are multiple ways to receive help.

Ten Truths About Alcoholism

There are many misconceptions when it comes to facts about alcoholism. Learn more about the truth of alcoholism from these 10 facts. Alcoholism is common. In fact, there’s never been a moment when alcohol wasn’t the most highly abused drug in the United States. According to a 2015 NIH study, over 16 million individuals in America have an alcohol use disorder — that’s 6.2% of the population. If you are struggling, you are certainly not alone.

5 Reasons to Embrace Alcohol Monitoring in Your Parenting Plan

Divorce and custody disputes are traumatic no matter what. Even the most amicable of relationships can be fraught with frustration and a period of adjustment that can affect the family. Adding a party who struggles with alcoholism only exacerbates the problem. Sometimes, what is worse is having one parent accuse the other of alcohol abuse without cause. These allegations can make it very difficult for parents to work together and trust each other in raising their children.

Balancing Safety and the Best Interests of the Child

Jean had recently asked her husband to leave their home because of his alcohol abuse. When she was making up her son’s bed, she found the phrase, “I miss my dad,” carved into a hidden spot on the bed frame. Alyssa was an active 10-year-old who loved ballet. After her parents separated, she refused to go to dance class. A family counselor suggested that Alyssa was punishing her mother by giving up ballet, which she saw as something her mother wanted her to do. When parents separate, regardless of the reasons, children’s lives are impacted.